Saturday, October 30, 2010

Offbeat New Album Reviews

By Brian Boyles on trumpeters

Kermit Ruffins, Happy Talk (Basin Street Records)
In 2007, Kermit Ruffins got married in Woldenberg Park during the French Quarter Festival. As his beloved bride Juicee mounted the stage, Kermit and the fellas pointed their horns in her direction and the audience roared. Just as things hit a crescendo, the Steamboat Natchez passed and blew its whistle. It was another epically sweet moment when you re-appreciate our intimacy with music. Grinning in of that bond for four decades now, Kermit is family.

I’d bet you a hot sausage that more New Orleanians per capita have stories about Kermit than any living musician. I thought David Simon said something when he talked about the city as a moment factory. Of course, unlike HBO, you and I can’t predict the moments’ arrival or if they’ll be punctuated with gunshots, and anyway, they don’t last. Fortunately for us (and Simon), Kermit is a foreman in that factory.

Remember Henri the emcee! Remember Emile the stone-faced pianist! Remember when No Limit decked out the band in football jerseys! All of us have been vipers, all aboard,all fo’shiggedy. These are unquantifiable,unrecorded gifts from our most public artist, whose voice isn’t perfect pitch but who’ll be there every week, telling you that New Orleans is home. Bumper-stickered out as that sentiment may be, it remains 100 percent fresh and heartfelt when Kermit growls it.

Like many recordings by seminal locals, these tracks only suggest the value of the artist—a temporarily detached from his environment and acoustics, perfectly produced piece of a man, but only a piece. You won’t learn anything you didn’t already know (Kermit loves the two Louis, Sinatra and the occasional show tune; he picks good sidemen; his trumpet sounds as fuzzily whimsical as ever).

Things kick off with “Panama,” featuring Mark Mullins and Dr. Michael White romping through the Caribbean flavored standard. (Should Kermit ever record an album of songs from the Southern Hemisphere, we’d learn a lot.) “More Today Than Yesterday” is great. “If I Only Had a Brain” seems long, but it also takes a salsa turn. Kermit’s unflagging dedication to Armstrong makes “Shine” and “La Vie En Rose” convincing, if not all that necessary.

But play a track in your car, or hear one on the radio, and feel your chest swell up with something very necessary: high hopes. The album consists of favorites from masters of sweetness and light like Sam Cooke, Sammy Cahn and Cy Coleman. As interpreters of fancy, of mosey, of the positive go, who’s better than Kermit?

We appear to be at the odd juncture where the roles of neighborhood champ and HBO character can co-exist in a city actively mutating and resolutely committed to its identities. Good for everybody that at least one person remains true and sounds good doing it.

By Jacob Leland on singers

Amanda Shaw, Good Southern Girl (Poorman Mayfield)Updated: Amanda Shaw’s third solo album proclaims, with its title, that it’s about the performer’s identity. That’s just as true of her debut, 2004’s I’m Not a Bubble Gum Pop Princess, but Good Southern Girl represents a more developed personal and musical statement. The new title is obviously intended to be something of a tongue-in-cheek description of Shaw herself, but it finds the artist looking to locate herself with respect to the Louisiana Cajun tradition she grew up with and the Nashville new country and Southern rock traditions towards which bubble gum pop princesses sometimes tend—and where they find mainstream success.

Good Southern Girlwas produced by Trina Shoemaker, who is perhaps best known for her work with Sheryl Crow on The Globe Sessions (1998) and C’Mon C’Mon (2002). It shouldn’t be a surprise, then, that its drums and guitar, in particular, sound like they come from a Sheryl Crow record. Much of this album feels engineered for radio play and dancing at music festivals, in front of the kind of big stages that more tradition-minded performers usually can’t book. Shaw’s crossover effort bridges the gaps it notices between the various sections of her musical upbringing with aplomb, and its execution is impeccable.

There’s simply no arguing with her performances; she can play the fiddle. She’s precise, confident, and playful in her approach to soloing and, in particular, to the Cajun, Creole, country and traditional pieces sprinkled throughout Good Southern Girl. Traditionalists might wish that she’d kept that work further clear of arena-rock drums, twangy lead guitar and electric bass, but Amanda Shaw—good Southern girl though she may be—is 19 years old. She’s justifiably more interested in evolution and experimentation than in preservation.



By Ben Berman on Tony Hall

Dumpstaphunk, Everybody Want Sum
Quick. Think of the worst smelling spot in New Orleans. Funkier than that one unfortunate spot of land at The Fly right behind the elephant patch at the Audubon Zoo. Think the intersection of Bourbon and Conti during Mardi Gras, and then think of the receptacles those trash heaps get thrown into.

Dumpstaphunk is that funky.

Right off the bat, the verses in the opener “Sheez Music” trigger memories of Brothers Johnson’s “Ain’t We Funkin’ Now” with the involuntary leg motions to match. Most folks by now know the sheer power of Dumpstaphunk’s live show, but this track and others here sound huge coming out of the Maple Leaf’s house speakers between sets at their Sunday crawfish boils.

Some might take the Neville bait and compare Everybody Want Sum to the Meters’ later Warner Brothers albums, New Directions and Trick Bag, but a better comparison would be with the city’s other seminal ’70s funk outfit, Chocolate Milk. Like that great group, I thought I liked it most when the band sits back and slinks along in the pocket, as in the third song, “Do Ya.” The tempo lends itself to drummer Raymond Weber’s backbeats and the punchy horns that accent the bridges. But my preference might just be correlation. Ivan Neville’s clavinet and keyboard playing make the track a standout, and it makes you stand up at attention when they burst from that into “Gasman Chronicles” at a velocity faster than the vibrations of one of Nick Daniels’ bouncing bass strings. Raymond Weber plays drums on this workout like a funk robot programmed with Swiss precision to play 150 bpm breakbeats. If you make it through all five-plus minutes you’ll be doing that James Brown grunt, too.

If the album were a Dumpstaphunk concert at Tip’s, the song “Oughta Know Better” is when you would walk to one of the bars and replace your beer. But much of that feeling is impatience to get to the Zigaboo Modeliste-penned “Standin’ in Your Stuff,” and especially to its ascending-to-descending harmonies in the chorus. The guest horn section is a welcome addition on this one, lending those choruses, breaks, bridges and transitions even more muscle, like a sixth 400-pounder on an offensive line.

Bottom line—this is a party album. It’ll sound great when someone plays it on St. Charles before a Mardi Gras parade. The feelings of party records often get separated into those that are straightforward/earnest versus others that are ironic/removed, and it seems obvious where Everybody Want Sum stands. But how about this detail: the Producer credit went to Morgus the Magnificent.


By Alex Rawls on singers

Aaron Neville, I Know I’ve Been Changed (EMI Gospel)
In a city of maddening talents, Aaron Neville’s has been one of the most perplexing. His voice is a remarkable instrument that has too often been employed for pedestrian purposes. It’s hard to argue with his drift toward MOR—he’s not getting younger, and underpaid R&B legends are a dime a dozen—but people have wanted something more substantial: The angelic desire of “Tell It Like It Is;” the streetwise grit of “Hercules;” the spirituality of “Amazing Grace.” Next to those, another version of “Everybody Plays the Fool” is likable but disposable.

On I Know I’ve Been Changed, he has put his talents to excellent use. He’s singing gospel, and producer Joe Henry makes Neville’s voice and Allen Toussaint’s piano the focal points of each track. It’s Henry’s least obtrusive production, but you can hear subtle, smart decisions such as the choice to record the tambourines off-mic and with the treble rolled down. That keeps a native percussion instrument in the mix, evokes Mardi Gras Indians, but leaves plenty of room in the treble range for Neville.

The song choices are smart with few obvious selections, but Neville sings each with literal attention to the words. For the title track, he’s almost woozy with the good news, while he sings “Don’t Let Him Ride” as if he’s warning the listener about a trifling woman. Throughout, there’s an appealing buoyancy in his performances beyond his quaver, as if the transcendent subject matter has already lightened his load.

The arrangements don’t blur distinctions between gospel and other genres as much as they unify them. The frameworks reference country, folk and the blues, but Toussaint pulls them together by playing distinctly New Orleans piano accompaniment. His bounce spurs Neville’s inventiveness as a singer and adds a secondary charm to almost every track. His solo in “You’ve Got to Move” is as unexpected as it is compelling.

The blues and New Orleans underpinnings also show Henry’s hand a bit. His productions often treat American roots music as fine art, and here he uses beloved musical contexts to frame another genre—gospel—that has historically been so message-driven that those who don’t believe find it hard to stay with. He doesn’t betray the songs, the message or Neville, though. Instead, by integrating the songs in the history of American music—and particularly African-American music—he puts Aaron’s voice and art in a dynamic context, and one that music fans can easily return to, regardless of their beliefs.





By David Dennis on Young Money

Lil Wayne, I Am Not A Human Being (Cash Money Records)
Absence makes the heart grow fonder, and jail time makes the rapper grow legendary. Lil Wayne’s arrest and subsequent eight-month sentence launched a “Free Weezy” campaign and creepy fan sites where pre-teens send daily love letters to the incarcerated Hot Boy. For an artist that dropped whole albums-worth of material every 12 minutes over the last five years, eight months is a lifetime. Finally, fans are salivating for new Lil Wayne material. I Am Not a Human Being gives them what they want. Sort of.

I Am Not a Human Being is a collection of songs that were left over from previous projects and obviously recorded months ago. The album is a breath of fresh air for those missing Weezy’s non-sequiturs, wacky voices and nimble flow. Though plenty of Young Money cohorts pop up for forgettable cameos, this is Lil Wayne’s world as he runs roughshod over the bass-heavy “Bill Gates” and double-time snares of “Hold Up (featuring T. Streets)” where Wayne raps “Pussy in the bedroom / pass that bitch down like an heirloom.”

While Wayne’s been off on his federally-sponsored trip to Mars, a few of his lyrical tricks have become dated. Over the past few months, Drake has all but buried the inverted metaphor (“Faded off the brown…Nino / Come and find me…Nemo”) to the point of making it obsolete. I Am Not a Human Being uses this trope a few times, with each serving as a reminder that these are indeed cutting room floor tracks recorded almost a year ago.

I Am Not a Human Being is a serviceable project that reminds us just how unique Lil Wayne is as an artist and personality. It’s also clear that the work is only a taste of his B-material, getting us ready for when Weezy is finally free to begin working on a real in-studio project. November can’t come soon enough.


By John Swenson on rock

Andy J. Forest, NOtown Story: The Triumph of Turmoil
If you’re a musician or band that makes a living in live performance, you probably have always wanted to make that killer live album that captures the magic of your best nights. But the best moments of live performance are almost always left in the setting where they occur, which is why some of the biggest names in New Orleans music have made inferior live albums. Recordings have their own mojo, and while many musicians use the studio conceptually, some are able to create a simulacrum of what they can achieve in live performance in a studio setting. The key is not the energy of the playing itself, and it’s defnitely not the interaction with listeners. It’s a subtle alchemy of the right material presented at the right pace and recorded with a precision that presents its own version of the excitement people associate with live performance. Creedence Clearwater Revival and the J. Geils Band made careers out of being able to cut records like that.

Andy J. Forest’s NOtown Story goes for this effect and for the most part pulls it off. While it won’t be confused with CCR or Bloodshot, it manages to achieve the aural equivalent of trompe l’oeil by simulating the excitement of Forest at his best in a club setting. The recording of the basic quartet—Forest, guitarist Jack Cole, drummer Allyn Robinson and bassist David Hyde—is crisp and uncluttered, with guitar, harmonica and vocals tipping into the red with a fierce, in-your-face presence. On “True to You,” those three elements come out of the speakers with the force of a Chess side by Muddy Waters with Little Walter on harp.

Forest’s songs tend to scan like novellas; here he keeps his lyrics to the bare minimum, sticking with simple concepts like “Who Are You Tryn’a Fool,” “Pretend We’re Not Pretending” and “You Gotta Pay.” The simplicity is effective as it’s in service of the story of the break-up of Forest’s real-life marriage. Less is definitely more when such situations are rendered in song, and Forest thankfully sticks to generalizations. The hot sex farce “Dogs Chase Cats” offers comic relief halfway through the set, and “The Blues Blues” is a great piece of self-actualization.

Forest is a multi-faceted songwriter who’s written some of the more interesting pieces about New Orleans over the years. This time around he’s letting off some emotional steam. In the process, he’s made what is probably his best-sounding record.



Walter Payton, longtime New Orleans jazz bassist and educator, dies at 68

Keith Spera, The Times-Picayune


Walter Payton Jr., the genial bassist who anchored the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and shaped generations of public school students, died Thursday at Kindred Hospital-New Orleans following a lengthy illness. He was 68.


Jazzman Walter Payton

Mr. Payton, the father of Grammy-winning trumpeter Nicholas Payton, was an exceptionally versatile musician and an exceptionally engaging personality. A student of music theory and music history, he could easily switch from electric bass to upright acoustic bass, from rhythm & blues to traditional jazz to modern jazz. He was also an accomplished classical musician who, for many years, kept a grand piano in his parlor. His recording credits include Aaron Neville's "Tell It Like It Is" and Lee Dorsey's "Working in a Coal Mine."


He grew up on Annunciation Street. As a boy, he played sousaophone and dismissed his grandmother's suggestion that he take up the string bass. "Naw, I don't see nothing but old men playing those things," he said, recalling the scene in a 2008 interview. "I don't want to do that."


But on Easter 1958, he attended a performance at the Municipal Auditorium by James Moody and Ellis Marsalis' New Orleans Jazz Quintet. "The bass players in both groups, they were having so much fun," he said. "More fun than anyone else in the band. There were literally dancing with their basses."


He was sold on the instrument. Decades later, he described its appeal. The upright bass is "shaped just like a lady," he said, laughing. "The hips, the waist. And the best thing is, she don't do nothing you don't tell her to. She don't talk back. If you press her in the right place, she says just what you want her to say. And no more."


Other than a brief time spent working in the cafeteria of Xavier University, he made a living in music. After graduating from Xavier with a degree in music education, he spent the next 25 years teaching in the New Orleans public school system. During his years at McDonogh 15 elementary in the French Quarter, he taught music and organized the school band; in the '70s, he conducted the young band at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.


He influenced many aspiring musicians, including his future boss, Preservation Hall creative director Ben Jaffe. “When I was his student – and I still consider myself his student – Walter was a bit scary,” Jaffe once recalled. “But he had a lasting impact on me. He instilled in me a respect for music.”


Throughout his teaching career, Mr. Payton also worked as a professional musician in a variety of settings. He marched with various brass bands, including the Eureka, Olympia. Treme and Apollo. He made his debut at Preservation Hall in 1965 and worked at the old Dew Drop Inn and the original Blue Room at the Fairmont Hotel.


After retiring from the school system in 1991, he plunged headlong into the life of a fulltime musician. With his Snap Bean and Gumbo File combos and with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, he traveled the globe. “I love being on the road,” Mr. Payton said in 2008. “I love it, love it, love it.”


Along the way he performed at Carnegie Hall, accompanied symphony orchestras and backed Robert Parker, Nancy Wilson, Harry Connick Jr., Clark Terry, Doc Paulin, the king of Thailand, and many more. He contributed to his son Nicholas' 2001 Louis Armstrong tribute "Dear Louis."


Mr. Patyon was a robust man who at one point was an avid kick-boxer and martial arts practitioner. Married four times, he was quick with a sly smile and an even slyer line.


“He always used to say to girls, ‘When did you leave heaven? You’re so beautiful,’” recalled Michael Paz, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band's road manager.


Mr. Payton suffered a stroke in January while in Washington D.C. on tour with Preservation Hall. He eventually returned to New Orleans, but never recovered sufficiently to return to the road. He had been in and out of hospitals for several months.


“I saw him a couple days ago, and he spoke to me a little, which he hadn’t done the last few times I saw him,” Paz said.


Village Voice: "Kermit Ruffins Couldn't Be Happier"

by Alex Rawls

Why the New Orleans icon is in no hurry to come to a city near you





"Nothing like barbecue between sets to pick up the band."Trumpeter Kermit Ruffins sprays a steady stream of lighter fluid on a small flame in his rolling barbecue pit, parked in front of Sydney's Saloon on St. Bernard Avenue in New Orleans. He's out of his usual suit and hat, wearing instead a white undershirt, jeans, rarely used white tennis shoes, and a kerchief. Ruffins has been an icon in New Orleans since his days with the Rebirth Brass Band; his recurring role on HBO's Treme further raised his profile nationwide. For visitors to the city, he is now emblematic of New Orleans' determination to have a good time, no matter what. Like today, for example: It's Monday afternoon—an off day—and he's in the mood to cook.


Before that, though, he's shooting the shit with guys on the corner, nursing a Bud Light, and prepping the grill for hot sausage later. He has a new album—" 'Hap-py talk, keep talkin' happy talk,' " he sings. "That's the title track. We put a second-line beat on it." But he's also got bats, balls, and his baseball glove in the back of his pick-up. "We've got a game every week," he says. "I'm the pitcher." After the game, he plans to return to Sidney's, the bar he owns in the Treme neighborhood, and grill out. When a neighbor opening a body shop across the street complains that he can't eat pork, Ruffins reassures him: "All-beef sausages. And once I start cooking, people bring other stuff—chickens, burgers."


The New Orleans–born-and-bred Ruffins was one of the founders of the Rebirth Brass Band in 1983, but he went solo in 1992. He is often likened to Louis Armstrong, but only as the good-natured embodiment of the Crescent City's mix of traditional jazz, the blues, and street-parade music. He'll travel if the price is right (mostly festival gigs, including a two-night stint at BAM in December), but he toured with Rebirth and doesn't feel the need to go through that again. He's got enough work in New Orleans, and he can do what he wants. Old friends from Clark Senior High School hang out at Sidney's—"We can talk about the same teachers and stuff that happened"—and he tailgates outside of Treme bars when the Saints play home games at the Louisiana Superdome. "I can't smoke reefer in the Dome," he says, his eyes widening conspiratorially. "It's better here. It's more convenient. It's more like a party."


Ruffins's grill is part of his identity. He cooks wherever he goes, even outside the studio during sessions. It's 12 feet long from trailer hitch to smoker, built in Atlanta for $4,200. A Saints window flag is duct-taped to its chimney. With a backing band called the Barbecue Swingers, it's a must, and he's had it for 10 years. Before that, he'd set up a grill in the bed of his truck when he played Thursday nights at Vaughan's in the Bywater. "Nothing like barbecue between sets to pick up the band," he says, laughing. "And it makes everything smell like a picnic." Oh, and by the way: "You know what else we did?" Ruffins sings: " 'What makes that little old ant/Think he can move that rubber tree plant?/High hopes/He's got hi-i-igh hopes!' " He mimics smoking a reefer and cracks himself up.


Happy Talk presents Ruffins looking outward. He's prone to celebrating the city, generally, and Treme, specifically, with tourist-bureau regularity, but there he leans on the standards and a band of New Orleans A-list talent that brings every track to life. He's a casual vocalist who settles for clich├ęs more often than he should, but he's still the Pied Piper of Good Times for New Orleanians and New Orleanians at heart. In Treme's premiere episode, someone asks Ruffins, "Don't you want to be famous? Are you standing there telling me that all you want to do is get high, play some trumpet, and barbecue in New Orleans your whole damned life?" The answer: "That'll work."

Friday, October 15, 2010

Donna's Bar in New Orleans to reopen — With A New Name

c/o | offBeat.com

Donna’s On Rampart—the old Donna’s Bar & Grill, which closed in August—has been leased by optometrist Dr. Eugene Oppman, who also owns the Carver Theater on Orleans Avenue. Oppman started his optometry career in the Carver Theater in 1987 and operated a clinic there until Hurricane Katrina hit.


Morris Kahn, a tax specialist who’s working with Dr. Oppman to revive Donna’s, says that the new owner has applied for all licenses including one for alcoholic beverages and the so-called “mayoralty permit,” which would allow live music at the club. Kahn says there are structural and plumbing issues which are being addressed currently.


“We’ve applied for the permits, and we’re waiting the required 45 days to see if they’ve been approved,” said Kahn.


Thursday, October 14, 2010

MY MORNING JACKET TO RAFFLE PHOTOGRAPHS FOR NEW ORLEANS




MY MORNING JACKET TO RAFFLE PHOTOGRAPHS FOR NEW ORLEANS

During next week's historic run at New York's Terminal 5, My Morning Jacket will conduct a raffle for two original photos to benefit New Orleans's Gulf Restoration Network (www.healthygulf.org) and Sweet Home New Orleans (www.sweethomeneworleans.org ). The photographs feature a shot of the band at Preservation Hall, taken by Danny Clinch, and a live photo from the filming of My Morning Jacket's "Okonokos", by Sam Erickson. Raffle tickets can be purchased at the shows for $5/ticket, or a book of 5 tickets for $20. The drawing will be held after the final show on Saturday, October 23rd.


LIMITED EDITION PICTURE DISCS TO BE SOLD AT TERMINAL 5 SHOWS

My Morning Jacket will be selling limited edition picture discs of It Still Moves, Z, and Evil Urges on each album's night. In addition, At Dawn and The Tennessee Fire have been repressed on vinyl for sale at the shows.

Tulane Students Are Helping Mardi Gras Indians Gain Copyright Protection








Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Vote for the next Threadhead Records project



Fan-funded New Orleans-based Threadhead Records is hosting a poll to help determine their next project. You do not have to register to vote. You just click on the link and can vote once per IP address per day through 10/18.


My favorites include: Midnite Disturbers (the all-star brass band, which has included Stanton Moore, Kevin O'Day, Skerik, Ben Ellman, Big Sam, Mark Mullins, Shamarr Allen, Troy Andrews, Kirk Joseph, Matt Perrine)


Tin Men feat. Alex McMurray, Matt Perrine (again) & Washboard Chaz

Injun Orchestra


Feel free to vote for your favorite.

Vote Here! Poll Closes at 12am est 10/18



One vote per IP address, per day. At the end of the week, the top 10 suggestions will be put up for a final vote. Final poll will be open for another week and at the end of that time, THR will choose a project from the top 3 most popular suggestions to pursue. Note: There is no guarantee that any project suggested will materialize into a THR project but THR will seriously investigate the possibility.


Who should we pursue for our next project?
AfricanZydeco Revue
RamaFest: Twangorama and Bonerama collaboration
David Torkanowsky
Kora Konnection
Anders Osborne (?), Johnny Sansone and John Fohl
VOW
Germaine Bazzle
groovesect and the soul project (soulsect)
Threadhead Records All-Stars
A childrens CD recording the music clinic kids
All That
Midnite Disturbers
Paul Sanchez and the Rolling Road Show
Threadhead Records artists do the History of New Orleans music
Wendell Brunious
Christmas funk compilation
Junko Pardners
The Injun Orchestra
Creole String Beans
Brint Anderson
Helen Gillet
Joe Krown trio
Bob Andrews
(Big Fine) Ellen Smith
John Gros
Sasha Masakowski
Tin Men
Johnny Sansone
Beatin Path



Monday, October 11, 2010

In Picture: 2010 New Orleans Ponderosa Stomp

c/o Brooklyn Vegan

words & photos by Jacob Blickenstaff


Ponderosa Stomp


The Ponderosa Stomp is now in its 9th year and has grown steadily since its origins as a backyard wedding party for festival founder Ira 'Dr. Ike' Padnos. The 2-day, New Orleans-based festival (that took place on Sept 24 and 25th this year) brings to the stage an amazing line-up of 'unsung heroes' and originators in the intermingled genres of country, blues, garage, rock n' roll, soul, swamp pop, rhythm & blues, and funk. Attendees experienced artists who actively recorded in the 1940's through the 1970's and 1980's delivering profoundly moving and authentic performances, providing a vivid glimpse into a world of music that might seem long-gone.


The Stomp is musically successful because it encourages artists to perform their original music and brings in talented and dedicated bands to support them. This year included many of the usual suspects (check out the review and pictures from 2009): New Orleans soul-blues veterans Lil Buck and the Top Cats, Western Music masters Deke Dickerson and the Eccophonics, Michael Hurtt and the Haunted Hearts, The A-Bones, and Eve and the Exiles. Jenny Dee and the Deelinquents debuted with La La Brooks of the Crystals who will be in NYC on October 20th when she plays a CMJ show at BB King Blues Club & Grill with Paula Valstein. Tickets are on sale if you don't have a CMJ badge.


The Stomp attracts a core audience of baby boomer soul and blues fanatics, rock-a-billies, Zoot-suiters, music writers, radio hosts, DJ's, record collectors, historians, WFMU-types, and a sprinkling of open-minded music lovers of varied backgrounds and ages. During the day, there are panel discussions between artists and respected historians, screenings of rare music documentaries and a record show. Even for the most die-hard, the sum total is a bit overwhelming. But Dr. Ike, an anesthesiologist by trade, seems to revel in the dazed and delirious look on people's faces at the end of 2 non-stop days. If you can keep your bloodshot eyes open, you'll see him floating from stage to stage with his airbrushed T-shirt that reads "Dr. Ike Stomped My Ass".


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Night 1 - Friday 9/24

DL Menard, Vin Bruce, Leroy Martin and Harry Anselmi with the Lost Bayou Ramblers

Ponderosa Stomp

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Tommy Brown with Los Po-Boy-Citos

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La La Brooks (The Crystals) with Jenny Dee and the Deelinquents

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The Relatives

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Thee Midniters

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Jay Chevalier with Michael Hurtt and the Haunted Hearts

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The Trashmen

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Night 2 - Saturday 9/25

Bobby Allen

Ponderosa Stomp

Willie West (with Lil Buck Sinegal)

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Lazy Lester

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Roy Head

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Backstage with Ronnie Spector's back-up singers

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Barbara Lynn with Ronnie Spector

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Barbara Lynn

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Wendy Rene

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Sugar Pie DeSanto (with Lil Buck and the Top Cats)

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Lil Buck Sinegal and the Top Cats

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Roy Loney and Cyril Jordan (of the Flamin' Groovies) with the A-Bones

Ponderosa Stomp

... with Lazy Lester

Ponderosa Stomp

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Joe 'Ducktail' Clay (in crowd)

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Red Simpson with Deke Dickerson and the Eccophonics

Ponderosa Stomp

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Young Jessie w/ Deke Dickerson

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Duane Eddy w/ Deke Dickerson + Ron Dziubla (sax)

Ponderosa Stomp

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